CHAPTER THREE
FRESH FRUIT BY THE SPIRIT DRAWN FROM DEEP ROOTS

An important point to consider when moving directly into the realm of the belief and practice deposited within the Oxford Movement and there derivative philosophies is the way in which history was understood by those who represented the shift for the future into a deeper understanding of the past in comparison to those who saw the past present and future through the Enlightenment eyeglass.

In short, the Oxford Movement and the Camden Society viewed history very differently than the Reformed Evangelical Anglican perspective and even more so from the semi educated theologians of the Baptist world.

The Carolus Patristic Synthesis
The Reformed Evangelical Anglican perspective had as a starting point the 16th century European Reformation. The scripture which they saw as primary only in that it was viewed s primary from a 16th century perspective.

“In the case of the Reformation, the interpretation of the meaning of a particular text consisted of relating it to the meaning of Scripture as a whole, and beyond that, to the whole of classical literature and western knowledge.” [1]
In real terms it was an optimised scholasticism that had purged out those elements that did not fit into the parameters of Enlightenment thinking.

In the case of nineteenth-century historicism, the nature of the 'whole' changed from the 'whole' of Scripture, to the 'whole' of the historical world and author behind the text. In other words, a text's meaning is determined by the exterior space of interaction between a text and that which is external to the text, namely the author and the world behind the text. [2]
Whereas one can not push this case too far relating to the Tractarian writers one can see how they moved beyond the closed historicism of the Protestant Reformation.

Whether it was be design or not one can say that the Tractarians and John Mason Neale created a clearly definable Carolus Patristic Synthesis. In terms of a schemer it would look as follows:

(i) Scripture as the starting point and final authority on all issues relating to Belief and Practice.
(ii) That authority of Scripture worked inside of a framework of tradition that began with the non canonical traditions of the Apostles (Romans 11:2) then processed to the Apostolic Fathers and then the broader Patristic body of literature.
(iii) The 16th Century Reformation was a time or enormous upheaval and in England a clear division began almost immediately. It was in the 17th Century that the group known as the Caroline Divines collected themselves to identify the differences between the Puritan Sect which represented Calvinistic and Lutheran sensibilities and those committed to “Uninterrupted Catholicity”. This second group, the Caroline Divines were those who were able to negotiate the times and were able to establish some clear outlines of what uninterrupted Catholicity meant in terms of belief and practice.
(iv) The 19th Century Tractarians and John Mason Neale rooted their understanding of the Church of England through this Carolus Patristic Synthesis.

SPIRITUAL FORMATION AT ST. ALBAN THE MARTYR

INTRODUCTION

1. MELCHISADEK AND A SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF REALITY

OWNERSHIP OF SYMBOLS
CONVERSATION AS A CONSTRUCTOR OF REALITY
SOCIALISATION OF THE GROUP ENFORCED BY HONOUR AND SHAME

Abraham At the Oaks of Mamre   -  An Allegory Of Friendship 
Being The Friend Of All

TRUST BASED ON LOVE NOT FEAR

3.2 The Passover Meal - An Allegory Of Atonement 
A Ministry Of Declaring The Gospel

THE CROWN, THE GOVERNMENT AND THE CHURCH AGAINST US

3.3 Mephibosheth And David - An Allegory Of Reconciliation 
A Ministry Of Love And Acceptance

3.5 The Feast Of Those On Highways And Hedges - An Allegory Of  
Reception 
 
Ethnic
Religious
Skin Pigment
Speech Accent
Fashion signalling
External Image
Social Position by Wealth
Medals, Diplomas,Trophies symbols of accomplishment
Monuments
Titles
Clothing

The Institution Of The Lords Supper  - An Allegory In The Sacraments 
Sacramentalism As The Common Life Of The Church

BELONGING
UNITY
ACCEPTABILITY

3.7 The Meal At Emmaus  - An Allegory Of Revealing Christ 
New Monastic  Communities

3.8 The Post Resurrection Meal At Galilee   - An Allegory Of Kindness 
A Ministry Of Community  
 
3.9 The Marriage Supper Of The Lamb - An Allegory Of Wholeness 
A Ministry Of Hope In The Eschaton


[1] Bradley H. McLean
Source: Neotestamentica , 2008, Vol. 42, No. 1 (2008), 52
[2] Bradley H. McLean
Source: Neotestamentica , 2008, Vol. 42, No. 1 (2008), 52

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